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The [Dwemeri] Sword
A History


by

Malron Igocroma

Guard of the Sword

Translated by

Norilar of Markarth


Translater's Note: This book is translated from an ancient text found within Blackreach. In the interest of preserving history and avoiding Falmer conflicts, I translated the tome without removing the original from its shelf. It was located in a an eerily silent room with a beautiful motley sword. I assume that this the sword Malron Igocroma refers to. The room also contained two corpses of poor, unfortunate souls, one of whom was killed by a Dwemer blade. The skeleton is too young to be Dwemer, however. I suspect he was attempting to take the sword with a team and was double crossed by the person who met a gruesome end by the trap in the room. One word I could not translate, so I leave it as was for future scholars. The word seems to refer to life of some sort, as Malron Igocroma suggests the engraver may have been the word. I cannot be certain, however.

In this book I record what history I have gathered about this curious blade.

Firstly, this building was constructed around the stone that holds the sword. The Dwemer of the area decorated the stone with carvings, and many tried to break the stone to free the sword. The current size of the stone was as far as the workers could carve. Many attempts were made to pull the sword, but all ended in chapped hands and poisoning by the blade and pommel. Scholars have tried to isolate the poisoning agent, but again, all attempts have failed. The blade is imbued with a sort of magic with which we are not familiar. The blade has been found to greatly affect the undead, often explosively, or so I am told. I am told that my duty is to protect the sword. This confuses me, as the blade is deadly and the stone cannot be moved. I asked this to my superiors, and they laughed, answering that if a war breaks out over the blade, the possibility remains that the enemy could cut the block of stone and take the sword that way. The sword, they say, can still be used as a weapon, albeit a very heavy one loaded by a machine of some kind.

I have researched the history of the blade itself, and have found little but speculation. Scholars believe that the blade was forged by an ancient kingdom, and that it was imbued with its power to protect the kingdom from certain doom. Little record of this kingdom exists, but in the scarce records, references to five [Dwemeri] are made, particularly one of a Stone Tower, who supposedly created the sword at first. Scholars suggest that the five [Dwemeri] offered their powers to improve the sword further than its original state. The three triangles engraved in the center of the flower on the blade were apparently added as tribute to goddesses previously rejected by the kingdom. In all other records of the triangles they are oriented differently. The triangles on the Sword of the face are upside down. Some scholars suggest that the kingdom was previously rescued by a hero blessed by the goddesses, and they prayed for the return of the hero. Their ignorance of the goddesses may be the cause of the upside down triangles, or perhaps the engraver, [Dwemeri] or not, despised the goddesses. The truth is impossible to know.

Whether it was ignorance or rejection of the goddesses that led to the downfall of this kingdom, I can only hope that us Dwemer do not follow the same path.

Notes Edit

[Dwemeri] signifies where text was left untranslated in the book.

This book can be found in three forms: this version written in Dwemeri, found with the Great Fairy's Sword in the Silent Ruin of Blackreach; a version partially translated by an elf named Norilar, found in Understone Keep; and a fully translated version found in The Ruptured Towers - Misery, or translated by hand at an Ancient Enchanter.

The book explains the the context of the presence of the Great Fairy's Sword in Blackreach, and the connection the sword had with Dwemer of the area. The book also alludes to legends about the sword and its origins, as well as speculation as to the significance of its design.

The book also provides a possible reason for the skeletons found in the Silent Ruin near the Great Fairy's Sword.

Translating Edit

Required Items

(Consumed)

Ruined Book
Match Conditions

(Kept)

Dwarven Book Ancient Knowledge
Alternate Conditions

(Kept)

Dwarven Book Triforce of Knowledge

The Dwarven Book in question must be the untranslated book found in Blackreach.

Background and Inspiration Edit

The Dwarven Book and its partially translated counterpart were included to provide lore for the Great Fairy's Sword and to establish parallels between it and the Master Sword. The Great Fairy's Sword is therefore implied to be Termina's version of the Master Sword.

The name Malron Igocroma is a corrupted anagram of "Malon," "Ingo," and "Romani."

The line "poor, unfortunate souls" is a reference to 1989 film The Little Mermaid.

See Also Edit

Great Fairy's Sword

The Great Fairy's Sword: A History

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